Wednesday, February 5, 2014

Why The MLB Free Agent Market Is Slow


Pitchers and catchers will be reporting to their camps soon, and yet there are still a lot of pretty decent free agents out there without a home. Free agents like Ubaldo Jimenez, Ervin Santana, Stephen Drew, Kendrys Morales, and Nelson Cruz are still out there, and while there have been some news coming in about each player nothing serious seems to have progressed.

So why is that? Well, it's not because teams don't want them, it's because of the compensation that surrounds these players. Teams don't want to give up a first round pick, AND have to pay market value for these players. The first round pick alone eliminates a lot of teams interest, and the ones that are interested feel they can just wait it out and get them at a much lower cost (especially teams that either don't have a pick, or the team they came from).

This rule about compensation is really hurting these players. I still like the rule, but you would have to think the players union despises it.

I think Drew will end up with the Sox. No one is going to give up a pick for him, and they will get him back real cheap. Santana sounds like he will end up with the Blue Jays, since he has been rumored to be dropping his price. Morales is a DH, so he will be in the AL, my guess is still Oriloes or a return to the Mariners. Cruz has been linked to the Mariners as well, as they try to beef up the lineup around Cano. If Jimenez can't sign a long term deal he could end up back with the Indians, the Blue Jays have been doing a lot of work on him, but it sounds like they like Santana more because of the price.

It's been a very interesting offseason for these free agents. Some of them really shouldn't have turned down their qualifying offers (looking at you Drew), yet these are players that could end up making a big impact this season.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

* Kendrys to AL since he's DH

MIke said...

Drew and Boras must be kicking themselves for not taking that $14.1 Million offer. REALLY overestimated the market.